Love Family?

If a habitual liar wrote a blog about the importance of being honest, I’m sure some level of hypocrisy would shine through. This example is how I feel when writing about traditional friends and family. The only connection I have with my family is Facebook. And as for friends, I can count them on the one hand. Now, this may sound absurd to some, but let’s dip a little deeper and see how one can say they love their friends and family without communication. 

In the blog What Tomorrow Brings, I shine a light on my childhood. Our preadult years are the foundation for our social skills. A supportive youth can build a confident person, while an abusive childhood usually produces an insecure adult. Let’s be real; every confident person did not receive a supportive childhood. There are exceptions to cause-and-effect laws. But in the case of group studies, the importance of positive childhood development is validated time and time again.

Love family. Indeed, I don’t hear from my family. I may receive a call or text once every six months or even a year. I’m good with that. My military career may have something to do with that mindset. Veterans have a stubbornness like none other. 😊 My mother and I converse, mainly via Facebook. It’s repugnant to force ourselves on others. It may behoove us to be ourselves. Say “Hi” when we feel the need, but if there is no reply, do not take it personally. We are responsible for our actions. We do not control others. If we do our part, what more can life ask from us? Yes, this may not be the scenario we want, but this is what we have. Work with it. I have a coworker that I greet with a “Morning” every day. He has never replied back. He’s not ignoring me so much as he isn’t cognitive enough to respond. Some people don’t do morning, just like some people don’t do family. But when faced with the question, “Do I love my family?” The answer is a strong “Yes.” 

The best analogy I can come up with is a child and his favorite superhero toy. Most children rip open the box and fly around the house, annihilating bad guys everywhere. Then there are those select few who choose to keep the figuring in its box and proudly display it on a shelf. Which child loves the toy the most? We cannot put a numerical value on love and say this love is more than that love. The fact is, both children show their appreciation. Isn’t that enough?

It’s all right not to interact with our family. We cannot force others to interact with us. One should never force themselves on us and we have no right to force ourselves on them. As long as we can truthfully acknowledge our love for our family, then we are doing it right. 

What if there is an emptiness inside left from the neglect of our family? That’s what whiskey is for. Just joking don’t do that. Whiskey isn’t the answer. I meant friends. That’s what friends are for. But that’s next week’s blog. 

2 Comments Add yours

  1. A topic filled with sadness – today’s reality.
    We are not responsible for another’s behavior (or lack thereof).

    Liked by 1 person

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